Carrello

0 Prodotti MXN$0.00

KhanAcademyVideos

Abbonamento a feed KhanAcademyVideos
New videos from Khan Academy 2019-08-13T17:04:41.462983
Aggiornato: 2 ore 33 min fa

Aerobic & anaerobic respiration

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Lets explore cellular respiration (Aerobic & anaerobic)

Respiration site & ATP

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's explore respiration sites and what ATPs are.

Autotrophs & heterotrophs (nutrition modes)

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's explore Autotrophs, holozoic, saprotrophs & parasites

Photosynthesis

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's explore the photosynthesis process.

Lymph & lymphatic system

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's learn what lymph and lymphatic system are.

Intro to vascular tissues (xylem & phloem)

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's explore xylem and phloem (transport in plants)

Intro to life processes

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's explore the various life processes that keep us alive.

Phloem & translocation

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's explore the translocation through phloem

Xylem & transpiration

Mar, 2019-07-23 07:02
Let's learn how transpiration helps water transport in xylem

Solving equations by graphing

Sab, 2019-07-20 12:15
You probably already solved a system of equations by graphing the equations and looking for intersection points. This method can actually be used to solve (or find an approximate solution to) any single equation, no matter what kind! This is a very exciting tool.

Zeros of polynomials (multiplicity)

Sab, 2019-07-20 12:15
Given the graph of a polynomial and looking at its x-intercepts, we can determine the factors the polynomial must have. Additionally, we can determine whether those factors are raised to an odd power or to an even power (this is called the multiplicity of the factors).

Quadratic systems: a line and a parabola

Sab, 2019-07-20 12:15
A system of equations that contains one linear equation and one quadratic equations can be solved both graphically and algebraically. Each method has its pros and cons. See an example using both methods.

Positive and negative intervals of polynomials

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
If we know all the zeros of a polynomial, then we can determine the intervals over which the polynomial is positive and negative. This is because the polynomial has the same sign between consecutive zeros. So all we need to do is check is interval that is between two consecutive zeros (or before the smallest zero and after the largest zero).

Zeros of polynomials introduction

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
The zeros of a polynomial p(x) are all the x-values that make the polynomial equal to zero. They are interesting to us for many reasons, one of which is that they tell us about the x-intercepts of the polynomial's graph. We will also see that they are directly related to the factors of the polynomial.

Zeros of polynomials: plotting zeros

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
When we are given a polynomial in factored form, we can quickly find the polynomial's zeros. Then, we can represent them as the x-intercepts of the polynomial's graph.

Zeros of polynomials (with factoring): common factor

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
When a polynomial is given in factored form, we can quickly find its zeros. When its given in expanded form, we can factor it, and then find the zeros! Here is an example of a 3rd degree polynomial we can factor by first taking a common factor and then using the sum-product pattern.

Zeros of polynomials: matching equation to graph

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
When we are given the graph of a polynomial, we can deduce what its zeros are, which helps us determine a few factors the polynomial's equation must include.

Multiplicity of zeros of polynomials

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
The polynomial p(x)=(x-1)(x-3)² is a 3rd degree polynomial, but it has only 2 distinct zeros. This is because the zero x=3, which is related to the factor (x-3)², repeats twice. This is called multiplicity. It means that x=3 is a zero of multiplicity 2, and x=1 is a zero of multiplicity 1. Multiplicity is a fascinating concept, and it is directly related to graphical behavior of the polynomial around the zero.

Polynomial division introduction

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
When we divide the polynomial p(x) by q(x) we are basically asking "what should we multiply by q(x) to get p(x)?" If this sounds familiar, it's because it's very similar to dividing numbers! In this introduction we see how some quotients end up as a polynomial, while other times we have a remainder and cannot express the quotient as a polynomial. This is very similar to quotients of integers!

Zeros of polynomials: matching equation to zeros

Sab, 2019-07-20 08:07
When we are given a list of the zeros of a polynomial, we can conclude the polynomial must have certain factors, which gives us information about the equation of the polynomial.

Pagine

Argomenti del forum attivi