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New videos from Khan Academy 2021-07-21T16:07:24.161336
Actualizado: hace 5 horas 32 mins

Hess's law

Mar, 2021-04-20 04:25
Hess's law states that if a process can be expressed as the sum of two or more steps, the enthalpy change for the overall process is the sum of the ΔH values for each step. To use Hess's law, two principles must be understood: one, if an equation is reversed, the sign of the ΔH value is also reversed. Two, if an equation is multiplied by a coefficient, the ΔH value is multiplied by the same coefficient.

Bond enthalpies

Mar, 2021-04-20 04:25
The enthalpy of a bond is the enthalpy change that occurs when 1 mole of a particular bond is broken in the gas phase. Since energy is required to break a chemical bond, bond enthalpies are always reported as positive values. For any chemical reaction, the estimated change in enthalpy is the sum of the bond enthalpies of the bonds broken minus the sum of the bond enthalpies of the bonds formed.

Representing endothermic and exothermic processes using energy diagrams

Mar, 2021-04-20 04:25
A physical or chemical process can be represented using an energy diagram, which shows how the potential energy of the initial state relates to the potential energy of the final state. If the initial state has a lower potential energy than the final state, the process is endothermic. If the initial state has a higher potential energy than the final state, the process is exothermic.

Maryam Hoseini's Every Day Abstractions

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:22
Video by Art21 How does a painter translate the real into the abstract? From her Brooklyn studio, artist Maryam Hoseini explores the spaces in between painting and drawing, figuration and abstraction, and the personal experiences embedded in her work and the multiple interpretations viewers can bring to it. As she flips through her pencil drawings and resumes work on an acrylic painting, the artist recounts her early interest in drawing classes and the strong, female art teacher in her native Iran that inspired her. Hoseini's current work depicts fragmented—often female—bodies floating in abstract, flattened architectural spaces, in suggestive, but open-ended narratives. With her work shown at major exhibitions around the world, Hoseini explains the concept behind her recently commissioned series of paintings for an exhibition coinciding with the 58th Venice Biennale. A reimagining of the famous 12th-century poem about Laylah and Majnun, Hoseini's paintings focus on the female character in the legend, a woman who, as the artist puts it, "was banned from speaking and desiring what she really wanted." This sense of fear and anxiety, punctuated with strength and humor, pervade Hoesini's work. The artist tracks the evolution of her style, coming to the conclusion that her choice to depict fragmented, headless bodies and fractured, illegible spaces reflects her "own personal experiences and life as an immigrant and as a person who is not even able to travel to my country and to return to my work and life here in America." Maryam Hoseini (b. 1988, Tehran, Iran) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/maryam-hoseini CREDITS | Series Producer: Nick Ravich. Director & Editor: Veena Rao. Cinematography: Veena Rao. Additional Camera: Anne Sofie Norskov and Rafael Salazar. Music: Wesley Powell. Color Correction: Jerome Thélia. Sound Design & Mix: Gisela Fullà-Silvestre. Animation: Stephanie Andreou and Andy Cahill. Design & Graphics: Chips. Assistant Editor: Jasmine Cannon. Artwork Courtesy: Maryam Hoseini, Green Art Gallery, and Rachel Uffner Gallery. Thanks: Danielle Brock, Allison Cooper, Cut + Measure, John Elammar, and Alex Laviola. © Art21, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. "New York Close Up" is supported by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Arts; and, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by individual contributors.

Wangechi Mutu, The NewOnes, will free Us

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:22
Go behind the scenes with contemporary artist Wangechi Mutu, who discusses the inspiration and making of The NewOnes, will free Us, an exhibition of four sculpture that inaugurate The Met's annual facade commission, on view September 9, 2019, through January 12, 2020. Credits: Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Will Fenstermaker Assistant Producer: Melissa Bell Editor: Stephanie Wuertz Director of Photography: Jonathan Chekroune Cameras: Alex Rappoport, Stephanie Wuertz Camera Jib: Kelly Richardson Camera Jib Assistant: Foster McLaughlin Production Coordinators: Christopher Alessandrini, Bryan Martin Production Assistant: Anna Oehlkers Time-Lapse: Scott Geffert, Heather Johnson Original Music: Austin Fisher Works of art © Wangechi Mutu, courtesy of the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels Additional images © Wangechi Mutu, courtesy of the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels © 2019 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Luchita Hurtado's body of work

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:22
Video by Art21 Luchita Hurtado reflects on her eight-decade-long career and the relationship between the human body and the natural world that is embedded in her work. In her Santa Monica studio, Hurtado works on a new painting from her "Birthing" series, discussing how her experience of motherhood and her commitment to environmental activism merge in this most recent body of work. Born in Venezuela, Hurtado describes her childhood growing up in New York City, her first art classes, and the challenges of starting a family while maintaining an artistic practice. "It takes a great deal of energy, having the life of a parent and having the life of an artist," recounts Hurtado. "My real painting, I could do at night after everyone was asleep." Speaking with her studio director, Ryan Good, Hurtado explains that it was not until recent years that her work began receiving more attention from curators and museums. The artist travels to the Serpentine Galleries in London to celebrate her first solo exhibition at a public institution, showcasing over one hundred works and charting her many styles of painting and drawing: from dynamic abstractions of human figures to bold self-portraits that depict the artist's body from her own downward-facing perspective, from swirling blue skies with floating feathers to paintings with words like "AIR," "WATER," and "EARTH" embedded within them. Back in Los Angeles, Hurtado paints "en plein air" in a local park and elucidates on the tenuous relationship between humans and nature, which is the focus of her newest work. "We're all on this planet together and we're all related," says the artist. "To be in this park, with these trees, it's just the joy of life." Working in painting, drawing, and prints, Luchita Hurtado has experimented with many different styles over the course of her 80-year career, yet maintained a unique, independent practice that explores the relationship between the human body and the natural world. In reference to a striking series of self-portraits from the 1960s and 1970s, in which the artist painted her body from her own downward facing perspective, Hurtado states, “I concluded that’s all I had in the world, was myself. I am who I am because I’m doing what I want to do, not what I’m told to do.” Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/luchita-hurtado/ CREDITS | Producer: Ian Forster. Interview: Ian Forster. Editor: Morgan Riles. Camera: Matt Conway and Christoph Lerch. Assistant Camera: Matt Ward. Colorist: Jonah Greenstein. Sound Mix: Adam Boese. Artwork Courtesy: Luchita Hurtado and Hauser & Wirth. Music: Blue Dot Sessions. Special Thanks: Ryan Good, Brenna Ivanhoe, Cole Root, Jacob Samuel, and Serpentine Galleries. "Extended Play" is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Art21 Contemporary Council; Ellen P. and Jack J. Kessler; and by individual contributors. 

Stephanie Syjuco, The Visible Invisible

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:22
Video by Art21. At work in her Berkeley studio, Stephanie Syjuco navigates the deeply embedded visual tropes of American history applied in her practice. Describing the shift in priorities associated with progressing in a career as an artist, Syjuco notes a correlation in time spent between project management and art making. "My reality is," she says, "it's a lot more paperwork than I wish it were." To center herself, Syjuco spends time in her garden, harvesting vegetables and "empire crops"—such as tobacco, corn, cotton, and indigo—as part of her research into colonialism and the writing of American history. Preparing an installation for the Renwick Invitational at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Syjuco lays out garment patterns for creating American-prairie- and Civil-War-antebellum style dresses. Though self-admittedly not historically accurate, the dresses serve to act as signifiers, conjuring images of specific time periods in American history, as well as the tropes of womanhood, Western expansion, and Puritanism that viewers may associate with such garments. The dresses are made with a chroma key green fabric, a color typically used as a temporary backdrop for photo and video shoots—replaced in post-production and never intended to be seen. "The idea of American history is so embedded in our national psyche that it's almost invisible," says Syjuco. "It's like manifesting ghosts, hauling forward all of this American history." Stephanie Syjuco was born in Manila, Philippines, in 1974. Syjuco works in photography, sculpture, and installation, moving from handmade and craft-inspired mediums to digital editing. Her work explores the tension between the authentic and the counterfeit, challenging deep-seated assumptions about history, race, and labor. Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/stephanie-syjuco/ CREDITS | Producer: Ian Forster and Christine Turner. Interview: Christine Turner. Editor: Morgan Riles. Colorist: Jonah Greenstein. Field Producer: Laura Wagner. Camera: Tyler McPherron. Sound: Kevin Crawford. Artwork and Photography Courtesy: Stephanie Syjuco. "Extended Play" is supported by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Arts; and, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Art21 Contemporary Council; and by individual contributors.

Jordan Casteel Paints Her Community

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:22
Video by Art21 Where does a painter find her subject matter? With a process that takes her from the streets of Harlem to her studio in DUMBO, Brooklyn, artist Jordan Casteel paints vibrant large scale portraits, making visible the often unrepresented humanity of Black men. At first struggling to find subject matter that could speak to the political realities of police violence and implicit bias, Casteel drew inspiration from her twin brother. "People follow me like I’m a threat," the artist remembers her brother saying, "but they don’t know anything about me." Together Casteel's paintings illustrate the multiplicity of Black male experience; she began with nudes in domestic interiors before expanding to men on the sidewalk, the color and compositions celebrating the visual texture of her Harlem neighborhood. Casteel's work is probing in its tender depiction of Black men who, although often strangers to the artist, gaze directly and intimately out at the viewer. The film follows Casteel as she travels from a brunch at her aunt's Harlem home to a studio visit with university students, to an informal hangout with friends and finally back to the streets of Harlem, mirroring the artist’s own navigation of New York's diverse racial and cultural spaces. Recognizing her complex position as a Black woman painting the bodies of Black men, Casteel nevertheless feels present in the work. "I get really conscious [of the fact that] his story is not mine to tell," says the artist of her brother. "[I've] seen him as this really funny, sensitive, charismatic, loving young man...And as a result, this work really comes from my desire to share what I have known with the world." Featuring footage from the Studio Museum in Harlem’s exhibition "Regarding the Figure," and the Sharpe-Walentas studio residency in DUMBO. Jordan Casteel (b. in 1989, Denver, Colorado) lives and works in New York. Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/jordan-casteel/ CREDITS | "New York Close Up" Series Producer: Nick Ravich. Director: Orian Barki. Editor & Cinematography: Orian Barki. Additional Camera: Sam Balaban & Tom Kneller. Sound: Taeer Maymon. Design & Graphics: Open. Artwork Courtesy: Jordan Casteel. Music: UNRTHDX. Thanks: Lynda Blackmon Lowery, Marcia Cantarella, Phoebe Collings-James, Naima Green, Casey Kaplan, Chalia La Tour, Wayde McIntosh, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program, The Studio Museum of Harlem, Korde Tuttle, Didier William. © Art21, Inc. 2017. All Rights Reserved. "New York Close Up" is supported, in part, by The Lambent Foundation; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; VIA Art Fund; Lévy Gorvy; and by individual contributors. 

Raúl de Nieves, Beginning & the end neither & the otherwise betwixt & between the end is the beginning & the end

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by Art21 What does it mean to be an American artist today? From his basement studio in Ridgewood, Queens, artist Raúl de Nieves creates an epic stained glass mural for the 2017 Whitney Biennial. Born in Mexico, de Nieves immigrated to San Diego at the age of nine and has been living in New York since 2008. "Growing up in Mexico was really magical because I got to see a lot of forms of celebration," says the artist. "I got to experience death as a really young child. That's what my work is about: it's like seeing the facets of happiness and sadness all in one place." His commission from the Whitney Museum of American Art gave de Nieves the opportunity to experiment with the tradition of stained glass, and combine this new light-infused installation with existing figurative sculptures. With gaffers tape, paper, and color gels, de Nieves created a narrative that begins with personal struggle and self-doubt, but ends with "a celebration of life." In reflecting upon his father's early death and his mother’s courageous decision to move their family to the United States, de Nieves sees the installation as a form of remembrance. "The mural talks about this experience—this journey," says the artist, "I feel really happy that I could put so much emphasis on this idea of 'a better tomorrow' in my artwork." Raúl de Nieves (b. 1983, Michoacán, Mexico) lives and works in New York. Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/raul-de-nieves/ CREDITS | “New York Close Up” Series Producer: Nick Ravich. Director: Ian Forster. Editor: Morgan Riles. Cinematography: Andrew Whitlatch. Additional Cinematography: Ian Forster. Sound & Production Assistant: Nicholas Vore. Design & Graphics: Open & Urosh Perisic. Artwork Courtesy: Raúl de Nieves, Rafa Esparza, Aliza Nisenbaum & Whitney Museum Of American Art. Thanks: The Dreamhouse, Friends Of The High Line, Christopher Y. Lew & Mia Locks. © Art21, Inc. 2017. All Rights Reserved. "New York Close Up" is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; VIA Art Fund; Lévy Gorvy; and by individual contributors.

Kara Walker, "A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby"

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by Art21. This episode provides an in-depth look at the creation of Kara Walker's monumental public project, "A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" (2014), at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, NY. Seated in her Manhattan studio, Walker explains how the molasses-covered space, along with her extensive research into the history of sugar, inspired her to create a colossal sugar-coated sphinx, as well as a series of life-sized, sugar and resin boy figurines. A team of artists and fabricators are shown constructing and coating the sphinx, which, as Walker says, gains its power by "upsetting expectations, one after the other." Commissioned by Creative Time, "A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" is the first large-scale public project by Walker who is best known for her cut paper silhouette installations, drawings, and watercolors. "A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" was on view until July 6, 2014. Thereafter, the factory is scheduled to be demolished to make way for condominiums. Kara Walker explores the raw intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in her work, crafting vivid psychological narratives from a contemporary perspective on historical conditions. Over the past two decades, Walker has unleashed the traditionally Victorian medium of the silhouette onto the walls of the gallery, creating immersive installations that envelop the viewer. Walker's multi-media work—which includes drawing, watercolor, video, and sculpture—often reconsider grotesque caricatures, probing their persistence in popular culture and reclaiming their subjugating power to alternative ends. Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/kara-walker CREDITS: Producer: Ian Forster. Consulting Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Interviewer: Ian Forster. Camera: Ian Forster, Rafael Salazar & Ava Wiland. Sound: Nicole J. Caruth, Wesley Miller & Ava Wiland. Editor: Morgan Riles. Music: Pinch Music. Artwork Courtesy: Kara Walker & Creative Time. Special Thanks: Sikkema Jenkins & Co. Theme Music: Peter Foley. "Exclusive" is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; 21c Museum Hotel, and by individual contributors. Kara Walker, "A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" at Creative Time http://creativetime.org/projects/karawalker/

Tanya Aguiñiga, Metabolizing the Border

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by Art21. The binational artist Tanya Aguiñiga pushes the power of art to transform the United States-Mexico border from a site of trauma to a creative space for personal healing and collective expression. Reflecting the cultural hybridity and community of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, the artist discusses her upbringing in Tijuana, her training as a furniture and craft designer, and her artistic beginnings with the Border Art Workshop/Taller de Arte Fronterizo collective. From her studio, the artist and her team produce objects like jewelry and housewares to fund their social-justice-based projects, workshops, and performances. Aguiñiga returns to the site of one of these projects, titled "Border Quipu," where she and her team recorded the stories of daily commuters from Tijuana to San Diego. This segment also follows Aguiñiga as she prepares for "Metabolizing the Border," a performance and personal reckoning with the pain caused by the border wall. The work is a demanding physical feat: the artist walks along the border wall in a glass suit that is designed to break, in order to express the effects of the wall as wounds on her body and to symbolize the struggle of the migrant experience. Aguiñiga demonstrates how art can be both a personal “physical and emotional outlet” and a vehicle to help others “empathize and think about how we’re all connected to each other.” Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/tanya-aguiniga/ CREDITS | Executive Producer: Tina Kukielski. Series Producer: Nick Ravich. Directors: Rafael Salazar Moreno and Ava Wiland. Producer: Ava Wiland. Editors: Rafael Salazar Moreno and Russell Yaffe. Director of Photography: Rafael Salazar Moreno. Production Services: RAVA Films. Assistant Curator: Danielle Brock. Associate Producer: Julia Main. Post-Production Coordinator: Alexandra Lenore Ashworth. Design & Animation: Momentist, Inc. Composer: Joel Pickard. Additional Music: Amalia Mondragón. Advising Producer: Ian Forster. Additional Art21 Staff: Lauren Barnett, Lolita Fierro, Joe Fusaro, Meghan Garven, Jonathan Munar, and Emma Nordin. Additional Photography: Elan Alexenberg, Robert Biggs / Phoenix Drone Pros, Gina Clyne, Adrian Gutierrez, Nick Kraus, Christoph Lerch, and Alejandro Almanza Pereda. Tijuana Field Producer: Yadira Avila. Location Sound: Ariel Baca, Jacob Bloomfield-Misrach, Nikola Chapelle, Michael Cottrell, Rayell Abad Guangorena, Veronica Lopez, Baili Martin, Nathalie Piché, Chris Tolan, and Ava Wiland. Production Assistants: Ben Derico, Jake Grossman, Jacquelin de Hoyos, Keira Kennedy, Zac Settles, and Jorge Villarreal. Digital Intermediate: Cut + Measure. Post-Production Producer: Alex Laviola. Colorist: David Gauff and Jerome Thélia. Post-Production Sound Services: Konsonant Post. Re-Recording Mixer & Sound Editor: Gisela Fullà-Silvestre. Online & Conform: David Gauff. Additional Animation: Andy Cahill. Assistant Editor: Jasmine Cannon, Jonah Greenstein, and Mengchen Zhang. Translation: Ava Wiland and Russell Yaffe. Video Quality Control: Jonathan Hansen. Artwork Courtesy: Tanya Aguiñiga, Guillermo Galindo, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Richard Misrach, Postcommodity / Cristóbal Martínez & Kade L. Twist, Bockley Gallery, Fraenkel Gallery, Pace Gallery, and Volume Gallery. Archival Materials: AMBOS Project; Antimodular Research; AP Archive; Aperture Artbound / KCET; Isaac Arnstein / Cinewest Archives; Jenna Bascom, Courtesy of Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Border Art Workshop / Taller de Arte Fronterizo; Cecilia Brawley; Critical Past; Cory Doctorow; Sam Wainwright Douglas / Big Beard Films; Benjamin Duffield / Fierce Bad Rabbit Pictures; Filmoteca UNAM; Jason Grubb; John McNeil studios; NASA; Pond5; and Jack Snell. Public Relations: Cultural Counsel. Station Relations: De Shields Associates, Inc. Legal Counsel: Barbara T. Hoffman, Esq. Interns: Shane Daly, Grace Doyle, Eda Li, Daniela Mayer, Jason Mendoza, Nikhil Oza, Anika Rahman, Ana Sanz, Sara Schwartz, Victoria Xu, and Sadie Yanckello. Major underwriting for Season 10 of "Art in the Twenty-First Century" is provided by PBS, National Endowment for the Arts, Lambent Foundation, The Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Toby Devan Lewis, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Henri Lambert, Nion McEvoy & Leslie Berriman, and Sakana Foundation. Series Creators: Susan Dowling and Susan Sollins. ©2020 Art21, Inc.

Fred Wilson’s museum interventions

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by SFMOMA. Beginning in the early 1990s, Fred Wilson shook the museum world with his artistic interventions. At the Maryland Historical Society, he used the conventions of the the museum itself to comment on race, with startling juxtapositions such as 19th century armchairs displayed with slave shackles and a whipping post amongst finely crafted woodworking. His work uncovers inherent cultural biases and disrupts the more traditional way many Americans understand museums.

An interview with Alfredo Jaar: Gramsci & Pasolini

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by Art21. Alfredo Jaar in his installation "Infinite Cell" (2004) in Santiago, Chile, and various works. Through installations, photographs, and community-based projects, Alfredo Jaar explores the public's desensitization to images and the limitations of art to represent events such as genocides, epidemics, and famines. Jaar's work bears witness to military conflicts, political corruption, and imbalances of power between industrialized and developing nations, often taking the form of an extended meditation or elegy. VIDEO | Producer: Susan Sollins & Nick Ravich. Camera: Bob Elfstrom. Sound: Ray Day. Editor: Lizzie Donahue. Artwork courtesy: Alfredo Jaar. Thanks: Fundación Telefónica, Santiago, Chile.

Kara Walker on the dark side of imagination

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by SFMOMA. Artist Kara Walker talks about on the often-violent subject matter of her work, and wonders what her imagination reflects about society as a whole.

An interview with Kerry James Marshall about his series Mementos

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by SFMOMA. Artist Kerry James Marshall explains the background of his series Mementos (1994–2003). The paintings and lithographs were inspired by Marshall's memory of 1960s-era souvenirs commemorating heroes of the civil rights movement.

Postcommodity arts collective

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by Art21. The interdisciplinary collective Postcommodity creates site-specific installations and interventions that critically examine our modern-day institutions and systems through the history and perspectives of Indigenous people. Influenced by growing up in the southwestern United States, the artists Cristóbal Martínez and Kade L. Twist revisit their 2015 public installation, "Repellent Fence," produced with previous Postcommodity artist, Raven Chacon. A two-mile-long line of enormous balloons across the Arizona-Sonora border, "Repellent Fence" symbolically sutured together cultures and lands that had been unified long before borders were drawn. Shown installing ambitious architectural interventions at the Art Institute of Chicago and LAXART in Los Angeles, Martínez and Twist consider how American cities have been supported by and will continue to be transformed by the migration of Indigenous peoples from Mexico and Central and South America. To examine our cultural institutions and their demographic future, the pair thinks of the coming decades, when the U.S. Census Bureau predicts a non-White majority. “Our job is to allow a new public memory to be born,” says Martínez. “Here’s our lens; take a look at the world through it, and tell us what you think.” Other featured projects include "Do You Remember When?" (2009), produced in collaboration with previous Postcommodity artist Raven Chacon (2009–2018), co-founder Steven Yazzie (2007–2010), and co-founder Nathan Young (2007–2015). Learn more about the artists at: https://art21.org/artist/postcommodity/ CREDITS | Executive Producer: Tina Kukielski. Series Producer: Nick Ravich. Directors: Rafael Salazar Moreno and Ava Wiland. Producer: Ava Wiland. Editors: Rafael Salazar Moreno and Russell Yaffe. Director of Photography: Rafael Salazar Moreno. Production Services: RAVA Films. Assistant Curator: Danielle Brock. Associate Producer: Julia Main. Post-Production Coordinator: Alexandra Lenore Ashworth. Design & Animation: Momentist, Inc. Composer: Joel Pickard. Additional Music: Amalia Mondragón. Advising Producer: Ian Forster. Additional Art21 Staff: Lauren Barnett, Lolita Fierro, Joe Fusaro, Meghan Garven, Jonathan Munar, and Emma Nordin. Additional Photography: Elan Alexenberg, Robert Biggs / Phoenix Drone Pros, Gina Clyne, Adrian Gutierrez, Nick Kraus, Christoph Lerch, and Alejandro Almanza Pereda. Tijuana Field Producer: Yadira Avila. Location Sound: Ariel Baca, Jacob Bloomfield-Misrach, Nikola Chapelle, Michael Cottrell, Rayell Abad Guangorena, Veronica Lopez, Baili Martin, Nathalie Piché, Chris Tolan, and Ava Wiland. Production Assistants: Ben Derico, Jake Grossman, Jacquelin de Hoyos, Keira Kennedy, Zac Settles, and Jorge Villarreal. Digital Intermediate: Cut + Measure. Post-Production Producer: Alex Laviola. Colorist: David Gauff and Jerome Thélia. Post-Production Sound Services: Konsonant Post. Re-Recording Mixer & Sound Editor: Gisela Fullà-Silvestre. Online & Conform: David Gauff. Additional Animation: Andy Cahill. Assistant Editor: Jasmine Cannon, Jonah Greenstein, and Mengchen Zhang. Translation: Ava Wiland and Russell Yaffe. Video Quality Control: Jonathan Hansen. Artwork Courtesy: Tanya Aguiñiga, Guillermo Galindo, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Richard Misrach, Postcommodity / Cristóbal Martínez & Kade L. Twist, Bockley Gallery, Fraenkel Gallery, Pace Gallery, and Volume Gallery. Past Postcommodity Collaborators: Raven Chacon (2009–2018), Steven Yazzie (2007–2010), and Nathan Young (2007–2015). Public Relations: Cultural Counsel. Station Relations: De Shields Associates, Inc. Legal Counsel: Barbara T. Hoffman, Esq. Interns: Shane Daly, Grace Doyle, Eda Li, Daniela Mayer, Jason Mendoza, Nikhil Oza, Anika Rahman, Ana Sanz, Sara Schwartz, Victoria Xu, and Sadie Yanckello. Postcommodity Artwork: "A Very Long Line," 2016. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Director’s Discretionary Fund, Russell Cowles and Stuart & Kate Nielsen. Major underwriting for Season 10 of "Art in the Twenty-First Century" is provided by PBS, National Endowment for the Arts, Lambent Foundation, The Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Toby Devan Lewis, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Henri Lambert, Nion McEvoy & Leslie Berriman, and Sakana Foundation. Series Creators: Susan Dowling and Susan Sollins. ©2020 Art21, Inc.

Julie Mehretu: Politicized Landscapes

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by Art21. Episode #252: Shown working on two site-specific paintings for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), Julie Mehretu recontextualizes the history of American landscape painting by merging its sublime imagery with the harsh realities not depicted. "What does it mean to paint a landscape and be an artist in this political moment?" she asks from the decommissioned Harlem church used as her studio for the project. Referencing the ways that landscapes have been politicized through historical events—from the violent expansion of the American West, colonialism, war, and abolition, through to more recent race riots and social protests—Mehretu began by combining photographs from these events with nineteenth-century landscape paintings. Abstracting and digitizing the blended forms, she printed the resulting images on two monumental canvases, each spanning more than eight hundred square feet. Over these underpaintings, Mehretu adds gestural, calligraphic brush strokes before screen printing an additional, complicating layer of pixelated images. Collaborator Jason Moran, a composer and jazz pianist, joins Mehretu in the studio to create a musical arrangement inspired by her improvisational process of markings and erasure. Through their respective practices, the two artists create new visual and auditory languages in the hopes of processing the complex history that brought us to our present moment. As Mehretu explains, the paintings become "visual neologisms," that combine the work and inventions of past artists, "to address when language isn't enough." The paintings, titled "HOWL, eon (I, II)" (2017), are currently on view in the SFMOMA atrium. Julie Mehretu's paintings and drawings refer to elements of mapping and architecture, achieving a calligraphic complexity that resembles turbulent atmospheres and dense social networks. Architectural renderings and aerial views of urban grids enter the work as fragments, losing their real-world specificity and challenging narrow geographic and cultural readings. The paintings' wax-like surfaces—built up over weeks and months in thin translucent layers—have a luminous warmth and spatial depth, with formal qualities of light and space made all the more complex by Mehretu's delicate depictions of fire, explosions, and perspectives in both two and three dimensions. Her works engage the history of nonobjective art—from Constructivism to Futurism—posing contemporary questions about the relationship between utopian impulses and abstraction. Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/julie-mehretu/ CREDITS | Producer: Ian Forster. Interview: Ian Forster. Editor: Morgan Riles. Camera: John Marton. Sound: Michael Kelly. Artwork Courtesy: Julie Mehretu, Marian Goodman Gallery & SFMOMA. Music: Jason Moran & Jamo Publishing (SESAC). Additional Footage Courtesy: SFMOMA. Special Thanks: Sarah Rentz, Reynolda House Museum of American Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum & Damien Young. "Extended Play" is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; Art21 Contemporary Council; and by individual contributors.

Anselm Kiefer interview: History is a clay

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Surrounded by his paintings in SFMOMA’s galleries, German artist Anselm Kiefer describes the challenges and significance of exploring the past in his work. He highlights the subjective, emotional nature of both history and art.

Romance novels and slave narratives: Kara Walker imagines herself in a book

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Video by SFMOMA. Artist Kara Walker discusses her interest in popular literature, including romance novels, slave narratives, and even Thomas F. Dixon's 1905 novel The Clansman, and how all of these have influenced her work.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Border Tuner

Vie, 2021-04-16 23:08
Art21 proudly presents this special extended segment as a complement to the "Borderlands" episode from the tenth season of the "Art in the Twenty-First Century" series. Edited to focus on a singular artist narrative, this film contains original material not included in the television broadcast. "Borderlands" premiered in October 2020 on PBS.  Known for his large-scale, interactive installations, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer uses contemporary technologies like computerized surveillance, heart-rate sensors, and robotics to create participatory experiences and platforms for public participation and connection. The artist frequently works in and transforms public spaces, creating awe-inspiring, poetic, and critical installations, like "Voz Alta": a massive megaphone system erected in a Mexico City plaza to commemorate the infamous Tlatelolco student massacre in 1968. Spurred by his Mexican heritage and the growing nationalism in the United States, Lozano-Hemmer embarks on his most ambitious project to date: "Border Tuner," an enormous intercom system at the border between El Paso and Juárez that allows participants from both sides to speak and listen to each other via radio-enabled searchlights. At his studio in Montreal, the artist works with a team of scientists, engineers, programmers, architects, and designers to develop the project; at the El Paso–Juárez border, he invites local artists and performers and members of the public to use "Border Tuner" to listen to, share, and visualize their voices and stories. Highlighting the intimate, personal relations in a public space that is otherwise systematically dehumanizing, Lozano-Hemmer explains, “The most important role that art can play is that of making complexity visible. The usage of technology is inevitable; it’s up to the artist to use those technologies to create experiences that are intimate, connected, and critical.” Learn more about the artist at: https://art21.org/artist/rafael-lozano-hemmer/ CREDITS | Executive Producer: Tina Kukielski. Series Producer: Nick Ravich. Directors: Rafael Salazar Moreno and Ava Wiland. Producer: Ava Wiland. Editors: Rafael Salazar Moreno and Russell Yaffe. Director of Photography: Rafael Salazar Moreno. Production Services: RAVA Films. Assistant Curator: Danielle Brock. Associate Producer: Julia Main. Post-Production Coordinator: Alexandra Lenore Ashworth. Design & Animation: Momentist, Inc. Composer: Joel Pickard. Additional Music: Amalia Mondragón. Advising Producer: Ian Forster. Additional Art21 Staff: Lauren Barnett, Lolita Fierro, Joe Fusaro, Meghan Garven, Jonathan Munar, and Emma Nordin. Additional Photography: Elan Alexenberg, Robert Biggs / Phoenix Drone Pros, Gina Clyne, Adrian Gutierrez, Nick Kraus, Christoph Lerch, and Alejandro Almanza Pereda. Tijuana Field Producer: Yadira Avila. Location Sound: Ariel Baca, Jacob Bloomfield-Misrach, Nikola Chapelle, Michael Cottrell, Rayell Abad Guangorena, Veronica Lopez, Baili Martin, Nathalie Piché, Chris Tolan, and Ava Wiland. Production Assistants: Ben Derico, Jake Grossman, Jacquelin de Hoyos, Keira Kennedy, Zac Settles, and Jorge Villarreal. Digital Intermediate: Cut + Measure. Post-Production Producer: Alex Laviola. Colorist: David Gauff and Jerome Thélia. Post-Production Sound Services: Konsonant Post. Re-Recording Mixer & Sound Editor: Gisela Fullà-Silvestre. Online & Conform: David Gauff. Additional Animation: Andy Cahill. Assistant Editor: Jasmine Cannon, Jonah Greenstein, and Mengchen Zhang. Translation: Ava Wiland and Russell Yaffe. Video Quality Control: Jonathan Hansen. Artwork Courtesy: Tanya Aguiñiga, Guillermo Galindo, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Richard Misrach, Postcommodity / Cristóbal Martínez & Kade L. Twist, Bockley Gallery, Fraenkel Gallery, Pace Gallery, and Volume Gallery. Public Relations: Cultural Counsel. Station Relations: De Shields Associates, Inc. Legal Counsel: Barbara T. Hoffman, Esq. Interns: Shane Daly, Grace Doyle, Eda Li, Daniela Mayer, Jason Mendoza, Nikhil Oza, Anika Rahman, Ana Sanz, Sara Schwartz, Victoria Xu, and Sadie Yanckello. Major underwriting for Season 10 of "Art in the Twenty-First Century" is provided by PBS, National Endowment for the Arts, Lambent Foundation, The Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Toby Devan Lewis, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Henri Lambert, Nion McEvoy & Leslie Berriman, and Sakana Foundation. Series Creators: Susan Dowling and Susan Sollins. ©2020 Art21, Inc.

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